In over 50 years, the US Congress has just held its first public hearing on UFOs

In over 50 years, the US Congress has just held its first public hearing on UFOs ...

For the first time in five decades, Congress held a public hearing on unidentified aerial phenomena.

After a nine-page disclosure, defense officials investigated more than 140 instances of strange sightings by fighter jets and pilots, the hearing was held before a US House Intelligence subcommittee.

Officials were only able to explainone of the incidents a large, deflated balloon.

At the start of the hearing, Rep. Andre Carson, a Democrat from Indiana and chairman of the committee, said UAPs "are a potential national security danger, and they must be treated so."

Unexplained objects have fascinated and tense people for years, but often they have been dismissed as pseudoscience or tabloid fodder.

Despite the recent rise in mystery sightings, some researchers believe they need to be examined by scientists, not just the intelligence community, in order to obtain answers.

Beyond tin foil hats

According to Insider, the last year''s study confirmed the existence of an unexplained aerial phenomenon, but prompted more questions than answers.

Certain scientists claim that these mysteries objects can range from drones to weather-related events, to artifacts, to sensor glitches or even the handiwork of aliens. However, the research did not provide enough information to conclude that this determination was made.

Researchers like Haqq-Misra believe the government should provide more access to data and allow inquiries to occur in the open rather than behind closed doors.

A closed session on Tuesday''s public hearing followed by a closed session, which scientists like Haqq-Misra expect. "We really need transparency and new data to address this issue," he said.

UAPs should be examined withsatellites, fast-tracking cameras, and audio sensors at locations where unusual signals have been detected, according to Haqq-Misra.

"We need to do so in a systematic manner, look at this whole sky in many locations for long periods of time, and with many different tools, and see how many things, if any, appear to be incorrect."

It''s been a taboo subject for scientists for decades and is classified as pseudoscience. In part, government officials rebranded UFOs as unidentified aerial phenomena, in order to avoid the stigma inherent to alien visitors'' claims.

According to Ravi Kopparapu, a planetary scientist at NASA''s Goddard Space Flight Center, researchers anticipate that a scientific quest for answers and more transparency might help alleviate the stigma.

"There is a way to understand unknown phenomena," Kopparapu said of Insider. "We shouldn''t come to conclusions one way or another, whether it''s dismissal or reliance on a foreign explanation."

From the fringes to serious science

According to Kopparapu, there are a growing number of privately funded research groups focused on the systematic analysis of unidentified aerial phenomena, such as the Galileo ProjectandUAPx, a research non-profit.

Avi Loeb, an experienced and controversial astronomy professor, has led the Galileo Project, which has been criticized for allowing outspoken UFO supporters on the project, without having a science background.

"I think this is a great opportunity for scientists to show the public how to conduct a scientific investigation of something that is unknown," Kopparapu told Insider.

According to the agency''s website, NASA does not actively search for UAPs.

"If we learn of UAPs, it would open the door to new science questions to explore," NASA said. "Atmospheric scientists, aerospace experts, and other scientists might all assist in understanding the nature of the phenomenon. "Understanding the unknown in space is at the heart of who we are."

In the meantime, the Galileo Project is developing software to monitor data from large telescopes for interstellar objects, and developing a network of sky cameras based on signs of alien living.

This spring, the team will construct the first of dozens of cameras that capture both infrared and visible light and audio sensors on the roof of the Harvard College Observatory, and to record everything that passes through the sky 24 hours a day.

"We are moving away from a time when we were just thinking about them as a form of tabloid news," Kopparapu said. "These objects exist, and we need to use the same technologies and scientific instruments as we can to study our daily living. "

Sightings of unexplained objects in the sky have long captivated human imagination and raised questions about national security and even the possibility of alien life. These questions will remain unanswered if they are not subjected to rigorous scientific inquiry, according to experts.

"I think it''s significant that the military is acknowledging that there''s a thing that they don''t understand," Haqq-Misra told Insider. "If they''re willing to do this, I think then it really, truly is a puzzle, and we''ve to figure out what this is."

According to Kopparapu, "Science should be the forefront in understanding this unknown phenomenon," he added, adding, "I hope there will be more interest from scientists, and I''m eager to see what''s going to happen in the next couple of weeks with all of this news."

This article was originally published by Business Insider.

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