Climate predictions are supported by improvements in Ocean Salinity Modeling

Climate predictions are supported by improvements in Ocean Salinity Modeling ...

Salinity changes the ocean stratification by affecting the density, which has a good effect on the thermodynamic processes of the ocean, and then modulates sea surface salinity variations. Climate models have become an important tool for understanding climate change and predicting climate change. It is possible and necessary to identify the underlay mechanisms of variation in El NinoSouthern Oscillation (ENSO) by examining the temporal and spatial characteristics of sea surface salinity in the tropical Pacific. The CMIPs provide the

Prof. Hai Zhi from the Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, as the first author, and Prof. Pengfei Lin from the Chinese Academy of Sciences, as the corresponding author, led a study in which CMIP data were used to analyze model outputs and observations and to identify the strengths and weaknesses of individual models. These findings have been recently published in Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters.

CMIP5 and CMIP6 models illustrate the interannual variability in sea surface salinity and freshwater flux in the tropical Pacific, thus reducing the number of interannual variations in sea surface salinity and freshwater flux. Both have established a precedent in terms of CMIP5 and CMIP6 models, which have been underestimated. However, some CMIP5 and CMIP6 models have significant issues in simulating the interannual variation of sea surface salinity.

The findings of our study, as part of the CMIP evaluation, may be used as a basis for the evaluation of the CMIP5- and CMIP6-related analyses of the interannual variabilities in salinity and freshwater flux in the tropical Pacific, and may be an important reference for the study of the impact of ENSO on global warming.

You may also like: