All three Omicron subvariants have shown their effectiveness in vaccinations and antibody surgery

All three Omicron subvariants have shown their effectiveness in vaccinations and antibody surgery ...

According to new research by Columbia University and the University of Hong Kong, only one currently authorized antibody treatment maintains its effectiveness against all omicron subvariants.

David D. Ho, MD, director of the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center, and the Clyde56 and Helen Wu Professor of Medicine at the Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons published the findings on Natureon March 3th.

Omicron is a highly transmissible variant of SARS-CoV-2 that has caused the most significant rise in COVID cases so far in many countries. Researchers have identified three subvariants of omicron that have 21 mutations in the spike protein and these include BA.1, BA.1.1, and BA.2.

The dominant variation of omicron was BA.1. Since December, BA.1 cases have decreased, and the BA.1.1 subvariant currently represents only 10% of all omicron cases globally, although prevalence is increasing.

Ho and his team investigated the ability of 19 monoclonal antibodies and the sera from individuals immunized with one of two available mRNA vaccinations to neutralize the three known subvariants of omicron in laboratory experiments.

In blood samples from individuals who had received two mRNA injections, the decline in neutralization was less noticeable in blood samples from individuals who had received three mRNA injections, indicating that booster injections are essential for maintaining immunity.

All three variants were well-known among monoclonal antibodies tested during neutralization. Of the 19 antibodies, 17, 17 were ineffective against the BA.2 subvariant. Bebtelovimab, the most recent monoclonal antibody to receive FDA Emergency Use Authorization, is the only currently available antibody therapy that can adequately treat all three omicron subvariants.

As the case of new vaccines, we are narrowing our treatment options and putting our immunity at jeopardy. It is critical that we continue to develop novel strategies to combat this ever-changing pathogen.

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