Ahead of the Board's Oscar nomination, American Cinema Editors are urging Academy members to demand fairness

Ahead of the Board's Oscar nomination, American Cinema Editors are urging Academy members to demand  ...

American Cinema Editors is urging Academy members to demand "fairness" and requesting that the Motion Picture Academy "give us a voice" ahead of Tuesday's board of governors meeting, where they will have a postmortem on the 2022.

In a Monday message to Academy president David Rubin and CEO Dawn Hudson, "We feel cheated, insulted, and angry about the way our art was deemed superfluous in favor of outrageous performances and spectacle."

The Academy was under fire for failing to present eight awards before the live broadcast, and for adding edited excerpts from the winners' acceptance speeches into the broadcast. After the Oscars, the Academy was again criticized for its "disrespectful" and "clumsily edited" presentation of the awards, including film editing, makeup and hairstyling, production design, score, sound, and live action short.

According to the Academy, ACE encourages production designers, set decorators, costume designers, composers, makeup/hair stylists, short-film artists, sound artists, and all creative disciplines to join us in demanding fairness and inclusion.

The Academy's presentation in the lead up to the Oscars was attributed to a desire to shake up the show to boost ratings and limit it to three hours, although the duration ended at least three hours and 40 minutes. The 2021 ceremony, which because of COVID-19, was a scaled-down event at Union Station in downtown Los Angeles, was the lowest-rated Oscars telecast ever, with only 10.4 million viewers.

This year's viewers in the ceremony's return to Hollywood's Dolby Theatre were second-lowest-rated show since Nielsen began tracking total viewers in the 1970s. Before 2021, each year's viewership had surpassed 20 million.

You may also like: