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This is the most inspiring image of the ISS I've ever seen

This is the most inspiring image of the ISS I've ever seen

In November 2021, ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet captured this extraordinary photograph of the ISS above the Nile Delta in Egypt.

I need to talk about a photograph of the International Space Station, but I had a chance to see it, and a, NASA chief of exploration mission planning, brought it to my attention this week.

Today I'm going to be focused on this recent picture of the ISS in the Egyptian Nile Delta.

Merancy wrote that "I'm going to meditate on this recent picture of the ISS over the Egyptian Nile Delta today." The photograph shows the station at about 250 miles (400 kilometers) above the delta region where the river reaches the Mediterranean Sea. Earth below is illuminated by a mesh of lights, while the ISS is edged in darkness.

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The photo comes from a photographer who captured a series of spectacular ISS images during the November fly-around before he returned home.

The ISS has been framed like it's being recognized by the Nile Delta, all the people living there now, and the deep history of the region.

In SpaceX Crew Dragon glamour shots, the International Space Station shines.

The image is so poignant that the ISS has a long lifespan that it's already in orbit for over 20 years, and NASA wants to. It's already in orbit for over 20 years, but the station is really beyond expectations.

When Pesquet took the moment, the ISS might have been miles from the Nile, but it reveals a number of things that we all know about human history, from the fertile fields of Earth to the stars.

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