Monsun eclipse the month of June is the partial lunar eclipse this week, with an absolute moon eclipse sweeping Luonid in the meteor shower and blood moon

Monsun eclipse the month of June is the partial lunar eclipse this week, with an absolute moon eclip ...

This week is good for skywatchers.

For this week, a meteor shower and a lunar eclipse are running to tap.

The first celestial show will take place on Wednesday, Nov. 17 and thursday, Nov. 18 with a Leonids meteor shower.

A survey revealed that the Leonids, which peak in mid-November each year, is considered a major shower, but a rate of 15 per hour can be lowered in the country the brightest meteors in the world, are a giant, a planetary meteor with a huge impact on the earth. The meteors are known for their long and luminous tails, as well as their hard tails.

The space debris that rots with the atmosphere to create the Leonids originates from the comet 55P/Tempel-Tuttle, which takes three years to orbit the sun once.

The best time to watch the show is when the best times are on display.

By foot, get up and do the best of the night! If in the dark only 30 minutes, you'll find meteors.

NASA recommends patience. The show is scheduled for tomorrow, so that you can see how much time it takes to edgy you can catch that glimpse.

Sculpture eclipse is the largest lunar eclipse.

A partial lunar eclipse is also set for this week.

Moons will enter the Earth's shadow, causing a partial lunar eclipse on the evening of Nov 18-19.

The lunar eclipse occurs when the sun, Earth and moon join to that moon passes into the Earths shadow, called the Umbra. In this total lunar eclipse, the moon will only be visible on Earth and will in 99% of the Earths orbit, NASA said.

The partial lunar eclipse is expected to last just under three hours, thirty minutes, making it the longest partial eclipse since 580 years.

Why is the moon red?

The process is called Rayleigh Scattering, and NASA explained it that way: It's a process that makes the sky blue and sunsets red that makes the moon turn red during a lunar eclipse. This process is called Rayleigh Scattering, and NASA explained it it here.

The sun is causing the radiation and moving the earth's atmosphere. The blue light moves in waves, and the red light passes through different textures. When the Sun sets, the light passes through the sky, and leaves the sun. It is the blue light is a short wavelength, and it passes through the sky farther, before reaching our eyes.

During a lunar eclipse, the moon turns red because the only sunlight that passes through the Earth's atmosphere gives the lunar moon a redder.

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