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China Has Given 72 Hours To Close The US Consulate General In Chengdu

China Has Given 72 Hours To Close The US Consulate General In Chengdu

The US Consulate General in Chengdu (Sichuan province, Southwest China) is due to close by Monday morning local time. On July 24, the editor-in-chief of the Chinese state publication Global Times wrote about this on his Twitter page Hu Xijin.

"China has demanded that the US close its Consulate General in Chengdu. As far as I know, according to the principle of reciprocity, the Chinese side also gave the American side 72 hours to close [the Consulate General]," the message reads.

"China notified the American side of its decision today at 10:00 Beijing time; this means that by 10:00 am on Monday, the US Consulate General in Chengdu should be closed, " Hu Xijin wrote.

On July 24, the Chinese Foreign Ministry notified the US Embassy in China of its decision to close the US Consulate General in Chengdu (Sichuan province, Southwest China). The measures were taken in response to an earlier US demand that China closes its Consulate General in Houston (Texas). The Chinese Foreign Ministry said in a statement released on Friday that the US actions were "a serious violation of international law, key principles of international relations and the consular agreement between China and the US, and have damaged bilateral relations." According to the Chinese Foreign Ministry, the Chinese side's demand to close the US Consulate General in Chengdu "is a legitimate and necessary response" to the American side's actions.

On July 22, the Chinese Foreign Ministry announced the demand of the American authorities to close the Chinese Consulate General in Houston. Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin said that the Chinese authorities would take the necessary measures if Washington does not abandon its demand. The head of the press service of the US State Department, Morgan Ortagus, explained that the decision to close the Chinese diplomatic institution in Houston was made "to protect American intellectual property and personal data of Americans."

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