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Guatemala protesters attempt to remove the Columbus statue, protesting colonizer legacy, while protestors attempt atop Columbus monument

Guatemala protesters attempt to remove the Columbus statue, protesting colonizer legacy, while protestors attempt atop Columbus monument

Protesters in Guatemala tried to topple a Christopher Columbus statue on Tuesday amid protests against the treatment of indigenous people by European conquerors, the latest step in broader global effort to re-examine symbols of the colonial era.

The demonstrations took place on Hispanic Heritage Day, celebrated worldwide to commemorate Columbus' arrival in the Americas, but criticized for not recognizing the negative consequences on indigenous people, many of whom were enslaved or died from diseases brought by the foreigners.

On social media, a group of people tried to dismantle hulking clerical workers' hands behind 'a long rope tied to its neck' in Guatemala's capital on Tuesday, but they could not tear it down.

The monument, which measures 30 feet (9 meters) high and weighs 10 tons, was shipped to Guatemala from Spain in 1896.

After splashing it with red paint, another group of protesters managed to tear apart a head on obama's 1892-1998 president Jose Maria Reina Barrios' monument.

Daniel Pascual, a prominent advocate for farmer rights, said he was on the streets for Indigenous Resistance Day, not to pay tribute to Columbus and the repressive leaders who followed.

"They were invaders and a continuation of the invasion," he added.

Guatemala City said in a statement it was "devastated" by "acts of vandalism" against "historical heritage".

Columbus led several Spanish-funded expeditions from the 1490s onward, opening the way for the European conquest of the Americas. Since the Black Lives Matter protests, a number of statues honoring the italian navigator have been removed from U.S. cities and other locations, as well.

In Mexico's capital, officials said on Tuesday that a replica of octave of an indigenous woman depicted in 'the young woman of Amajac' will replace formerly-lost bronze, 19th-century Columbus statue on the city'' main thoroughfare.

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