Threesomes are generally pleasant experiences, according to a research, especially when shared with a romantic partner

Threesomes are generally pleasant experiences, according to a research, especially when shared with  ...

Threesomes are on the rise, and a research published in Archives of Sexual Behaviors suggests that these activities are generally enjoyable for participants. Men (versus women) and couples in committed relationships (versus casual partners) are particularly attracted to threesomes.

Sexual orientations are becoming more relaxed in Western cultures, and taboo behaviors are slowly becoming more accepted. Group sex arrangements, such as mixed-sex threesomes, are becoming more popular. These include people of different ages and genders.

Ashley E. Thompson and her colleagues note that surprisingly little is known about the outcomes of threesomes. Do participants tend to enjoy or regret these experiences?

Thompson, an associate professor at the University of Minnesota Duluth and director of the Sexuality and Relationship Science Lab, explained that his primary research focus is on all things monogamy. Mostly, she is interested in monogamy negotiations, violations, and alternatives.

Threesomes may be an ideal way for individuals to explore their sexual identity in a less stigma-reduced environment, as compared to other consensually nonmonogamous behaviors; i.e., swinging). Thus, I am interested in exploring other benefits associated with threesomes.

The researchers conducted a research to assess MST outcomes and to investigate variables that might influence them. They recruited a final sample of 276 heterosexual adults (217 males, 59 females) who reported at least one MST experience. Of these participants, 29.6% were married, 23.6% were single, 18.1% were in an open or polyamorous relationship, 7.2% were dating, and 6.8% chose other for relationship status.

The participants answered a questionnaire about their previous MST experience. They expressed their feelings toward each partner (e.g., friend, romantic partner), the sex of each partner, and whether they had experienced an orgasm during the experience. They also rated the extent to which the MST experience fulfilled their expectations and the likelihood that they would repeat the experience with these partners again.

Respondents reported positive mixed-sex threesome experiences. On a 5-point scale, the average score was 3.74, indicating that the experience was somewhat over expectations. Additionally, most participants said they would be willing to repeat the experience, and 87.5 percent said they had achieved orgasm.

Men were more likely than women to experience an orgasm during a threesome, a finding that refutes a body of research that emphasizes mens sexual pleasure above women.

People who participated in an MST session with a romantic partner expressed a greater desire to repeat the experience than those who participated without a romantic partner. There are a few reasons for this. Sexual activity between committed partners tends to involve better communication and a higher degree of comfort.

Couples who participate in MST activities together may find there to be a sense of bonding and excitement. Lastly, threesomes that include a committed partner may be less likely to violate social norms and less likely to elicit stress and guilt.

Thompson told PsyPost that people reported fairly good outcomes from their most recent MST, that they would continue to participate in the same MST if given the opportunity, and that the MST fulfilled (or even exceeded) expectations. Thus, MSTs may be a wonderful opportunity for adults to investigate nonmonogamy and same-sex sexual behaviors.

The authors of the study agreed that their recruitment strategies meant that individuals with good MST experiences might have been more likely to participate in the study. This implies that the results may overrepresent the positive outcomes associated with MSTs. Furthermore, the sample was made of cisgender and heterosexual adults, and further research will be required to extend the findings to other sexualities and gender identities.

Thompson explained that this study based on previous threesome experiences, which might have induced some form of recall bias. Although we attempted to minimize the impact of recall bias by having participants report on their most recent MST, research suggests that adults' capacity to recall memories is often hampered by telescoping (i.e., assigning thoughts and feelings that occurred before or after an experience to that experience).

I would like to pursue additional targeted recruitment methods, such as involving a representative sample to participate in a daily diary study in which adults are asked to reflect on their threesome experience(s) immediately following participation, according to the author.

Ashley E. Thompson, McKenna Osborn, Katie Gooch, and Mariah Ravet co-authored the research, An Empirical Investigation of Variations in Outcomes Associated With Heterosexual Adults' Most Recent MixedSex Threesome Experience.

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