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CPSC issues Life-Saving Tips to Millions in the Path of Tropical Storm Nicholas, which helps Million Americans to survive in The Path to Tropical Rain

CPSC issues Life-Saving Tips to Millions in the Path of Tropical Storm Nicholas, which helps Million Americans to survive in The Path to Tropical Rain

Then, it's a week before the end of the day. The end is 21 yen 2021 /PRNewswire/ -- https://www.cpsc.gov/New/-newsroom

The Consumer Product Safety Commission is warning consumers to be prepared for power outages and take steps to keep their families safe. Tropical Storm Nicholas threatens the Gulf Coast, and the US Consumer Products Safety Committee warns consumers that the Consumer Protection Commission (

Power loss: Use a generator sagly and safely to save energy.

Many use portable generators and other devices to protect the public against the loss of electricity and heat, thus exposing themselves to increased carbon monoxide poisoning and fire. Consumers who plan on using portable generators in case of power loss should follow these tips:

  • Operate portable generators outside, at least 20 feet away from the house, and direct the generator's exhaust from any home and any other buildings that somebody could enter.
  • Never operate a portable generator inside shackles or porches, not in the home, garage, basement, crawlspace, shed, or in confined spaces. Opening doors or windows won't provide enough ventilation to prevent the accumulation of deadly CO emissions.
  • Check that portable generators have been properly maintained and read the labels, instructions and warnings in the owner's manual.
  • CPSC urges consumers to look for portable generators and ask retailers to buy a portable charger with scalability to shut off automatically when there are certain CO concentrations in the energy.

The carbon monoxide that is produced by a portable generator can kill in minutes. CO is an invisible killer. It's colorless and odorless. According to the CDC, more than 400 people die each year in the United States from CO poisoning. According to the CPSC, about 78 consumers die annually from CO poisoning caused by portable generators. The CO poisoning from portable generators can quickly happen so quickly that exposed people become unconscious before recognizing the symptoms of nausea, dizziness or weakness.

To help keep carbon monoxide poisoning at bay, you should be careful not to poison carbon.

  • Install batteries-operated CO alarms or CO Alarms with battery backup at home, outside separate sleeping areas and on each floor of your home.
  • When it sounds, always press the test button and replace batteries. Never ignore a carbon monoxide alarm. Get out immediately. Call 911 then.

Dangers with Charcoal and Candles.

  • Never use charcoal indoors. Burning charcoal in an enclosed space can produce harmful carbon monoxide levels. Don't cook on charcoal grills in a garage, even with the door open.
  • Keep caution against burning candles. Use flashlights instead. If using candles, don't burn them on or near anything that can catch fire. Never leave candles unattended. Don't forget to leave the room and wake candles before sleeping.
  • You must ensure smoke alarms are installed at every house level and inside each bedroom. Never ignore a smoke alarm ringing. Get outside immediately. Call 911.

If the storm causes flooding, the water will be flooded. : - ; ).

  • Look for signs that your appliances have gotten wet. Discard unplugged electrical or gas appliances that have been wet because they pose electric shock and fire hazards. Don't touch any electric or gas appliances that are still connected.
  • Before using your appliances, have a professional, your gas or electric company evaluate your home and replace all gas control valves, electrical wiring, circuit breakers, and fuses that are under water.

If the storm causes gas leaks, the gas is leaky. :

  • Smell or hear gas? You don't turn the lights on or off or use electrical equipment, including a phone. Leave the house and contact the local gas authorities from outside.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said that you might need to adjust preparedness measures, based on the latest health and safety guidelines from the CDC and local officials.

Remember, it takes only one storm to wreak havoc, causing mass destruction and death. Be informed, prepared and safe!

CPSC resources: Carbon Monoxide Safety Center for the carbon monoxidise safety center.

Links to media-quality video channels: the broadcast quality is the source of the content. Safety b-roll: https://spaces.hightail.com/space/XtFQ7YqK0x Flood safety e-wallet: http://Spaces-high-tail/semi

For more information, call Nicolette Nye at 917-838-9910. [email protected] The call is 240-204-4410.

CPSC is about the United States. The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is responsible for protecting the public against excessive risk of injury or death associated with thousands of types of consumer products. In the nation, the costs of consumer product incidents exceed one trillion dollars annually. The number of injuries that result from consumer products has decreased for nearly 50 years, thanks to the work of CPSC to ensure the safety of the consumer product.

The Federal law prohibits anyone from selling products under the condition that a manufacturer or if he or she publicly announced voluntary recalls of products or that it is not mandatory or not.

For lifesaving information:

  • Visit CPSC.gov.
  • Sign up to receive your newsletter. E-mail alerts alert. .
  • Follow us on the other side. Facebook Instagram, Instagram. @USCPSC Twitter Twitter and Twitter @USCPSC .
  • Report a dangerous product or if he or she has abused the product. www.SaferProducts.gov. .
  • Call CPSC's Hotline at 1-800-638-2772 (TTY 301-595-7054).
  • Please contact a friend. specialist based media media specialist in media & media .

Number 21-196: Release Date: 21.

SOURCE US Consumer Product Safety Commission SPORTS Consumer Products Safety Act (SOURCES) U.S. Consumer Protection Commission (Couple and Safety) Consumer Safety (COS)

Related Links

www.cpsc.gov.

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